14
Nov

Make-up Safety circa 1984

I was cleaning out some files and found a consumer safety booklet titled EYE PRODUCTS. The copyright belongs to Merle Norman Cosmetics and it was dated 6-84.
The brochure contents promote Merle Norman cosmetics but very subtly. The emphasis is on safe use of eye products and cosmetics. I’d like to share the Twelve Tips for Safety as they are still relevant and timely.

TWELVE TIPS FOR SAFETY

  1. If any eye product causes irritation, stop using it immediately. You should contact your eye doctor.
  2. Do not allow cosmetics to become covered with dust or contaminated with dirt or soil. Wipe off the container with a damp cloth if visible dust or dirt is present, and do not use the container until it is dry.
  3. Do not use old containers of eye cosmetics. If you haven’t used a product for several months, it is safer to discard it and purchase a new one.
  4. Do not spit or introduce any foreign substance (even water) into any cosmetic. The bacteria in your mouth or in tap water may grow in the cosmetic and subsequent application to the eye may cause infection.
  5. Do not share your cosmetics. Another person’s bacteria in your cosmetic could be hazardous to you.
  6. Do not store cosmetics at high temperatures. Cosmetics held for long periods in hot cars, for example, are more susceptible to deterioration.
  7. Avoid using eye cosmetics if you have an infection of the eye or skin around the eye, or if the skin is inflamed.
  8. Recognize that your hands contain millions of bacteria which, if placed in your eye, could cause infections. Wash your hands carefully before applying cosmetics to your eyes.
  9. Make sure that any instrument you place in the area of your eye is clean, and extremely careful not to scratch the eyeball or any other area.
  10. When applying or removing eye cosmetics, be extremely careful not to scratch the eyeball or any other sensitive area.
  11. Use the side of the brush or applicator in a motion parallel to the lash line. Never point applicators directly into the eye area.
  12. Take particular care in using eye cosmetics if you have a history of allergies to cosmetic products. If in doubt, consult your eye doctor before using any such cosmetic products.

The take home message is don’t use old products, don’t share make-up, wash your hands before touching the area around your eye and don’t hesitate to call for help.

30
Aug

Back to School

School age children can experience unexpected and sudden changes in vision that may lead to behavioral and attention issues in the classroom. Make a comprehensive eye examination a priority for your child this year.

Some important health and safety tips for your child’s eyes:

  • Look for indicators of vision issues.    Common signals that your child may be experiencing a vision problem include covering one eye, holding reading materials close to the face, a short attention span and complaining of headaches or other discomfort.

 

  • Prevent eye strain by monitoring use of digital devices. Increased exposure to electronic devices in and out of the classroom can cause digital eyestrain, including burning or itchy eyes, headaches, blurred vision and exhaustion. The American Optometric Association recommends following the 20-20-20 rule (taking a 20-second break, every 20 minutes and looking at something at least 20 feet away), blinking frequently and adjusting your child’s computer screen to prevent glare can prevent discomfort.

 

  • Wear appropriate eye protection for sports and outdoor activities.  Well-fitting, protective eye wear and quality sunglasses that offer UV protection are also critical to maintaining key visual skills for sports and preventing injuries.

 

One in four children has an undiagnosed vision problem because changes in their eyesight go unrecognized by both the child and their parents. Include an eye exam on your back to school list. It may be the single most important investment you can make in your child’s education and overall health.

 

23
Aug

What does a Baby See?

An infant’s vision improves significantly during his first 6 months. Basic visual function develops rapidly during the first year.

Newborns focus on objects that are 8-10 inches away and will wince and blink in response to bright light, but only for a brief amount of time. At birth approximate visual acuity is 20/800. Infants will stare intently at high contrast images such as the edges of faces. Newborn eyes may cross or wander for the first 4 months.
By two to three months, babies have an approximate visual acuity of 20/400. At this age, they will track movement as well as smile at objects that are about a foot away. Reaching for objects around 3 months is expected.
At 6 months the vision has improved to at least 20/100. A 6 month old infant will open his mouth to a spoon and will recognize his own face in the mirror. Both eyes should focus equally. Depth perception is developing.
A twelve month old child will have visual acuities of 20/60 and can judge distances fairly well, throw things with precision and pick up small objects with the fingers and thumb.

A comprehensive visual assessment between 9-12 months is recommended, earlier if the infant is at risk for eye or vision disorders. Early intervention is critical to successful vision and treatment.

Acuity Testing Infants

Preferential Looking Test

13
Jun

Quality Sunglasses

Sunglasses not only offer style but they offer protection from damaging ultraviolet radiation. Quality sunglasses are more expensive and worth it because of the premium optics, coatings, frames and style.
 The optics of your sunglasses determine the clarity and comfort of vision. Polarized lenses like Maui Jim minimize glare and reflections.
Sunglass lens treatments increase visibility and comfort. Backside anti-reflective coatings reduce glare from behind and repel water and dust. A mirror coating further reflects annoying light and glare.
Well-made frames start with quality materials that resist breakage and bending. The weight and balance of the frame is important for comfort as well.
Frames are styled for specific sports or can be highly fashionable. The details may include flexible hinges, variable color combinations and wrap styling.  

Don’t skimp on your sunglasses. You deserve the best comfort, protection and style.

1
Jun

Digital Eyestrain

 

A 2016 report by the Vision Council found that 60% of Americans use digital devices for 5 or more hours each day. 70% of Americans use 2 or more devices at a time.
The term Digital Eyestrain has replaced the term Computer Vision Syndrome due to the increase in types of digital devices. Digital Eyestrain is defined as “physical discomfort of one’s eyes after spending periods of time throughout the day in front of a digital device, such as a computer or smartphone.”

The list of Digital Eyestrain symptoms is long:

Eyestrain, Burning Eyes, Difficulty Refocusing, Grittiness, Dry Eyes, Blurred Vision, Headaches, Irritation, Tired Eyes, Neck/Shoulder/Back Pain, Double Vision, and Redness.

It is reported that we blink an average of 10 times a minute normally, when reading, using a smartphone or other device the blink rate drops to 4 times a minute. Blinking is a vital component to ocular surface health and tear stability. More important than how often we blink is how well we blink. An incomplete blink can cause more tear instability than not enough blinks. A complete blink is necessary to stimulate a muscle on the eyelid margin that releases an important component of the tear film.

Treatment for Digital Eyestrain includes wearing the best visual correction for the task. Reducing glare and fatiguing light with coatings is beneficial also. For contact lens wearers the proper correction for the working distance is important. A clean contact lens surface and proper blinking can minimize dry eye symptoms.

26
Apr

Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis

Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis or GPC, is typically associated with contact lens wear. Symptoms include, contact lens discomfort and fluctuating vision. There is often mucus discharge from one or both eyes. A particularly annoying symptom of GPC is dislocation and excess movement of the contact lens.

GPC may occur months or even years after you begin contact lens wear. Among the things that may cause GPC are improper cleaning of contact lenses, infrequent contact lens replacement, and wearing contact lenses for too many hours.

There are tiny papilla on the inside of the upper eyelid normally. Allergies can cause the papilla to swell and secrete histamine which causes itchy eyes. In GPC, the papilla greatly enlarge due to interaction with foreign bodies such as debris on the contact lens or the contact lens itself. The large papilla secrete sticky proteins which adhere to the contact lens causing more debris and forcing the lens to move out of place.

Resolution of GPC includes decrease or cessation of contact lens wear, and often treatment with topical cortico-steroids and mast-cell inhibitors eyedrops. Contact lens wear can usually be resumed with modifications in the lens type and care regime.

21
Mar

Minimize Risk of Contact Lens Related Problems

Contact lens safety depends on the wearer following the prescribed lens wear schedule and cleaning regime.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) emphasizes three key areas to healthy contact lens wear:
1. Healthy contact lens hygiene habits

Always wash your hands with soap and water before inserting and removing the contact lenses

Replace your contact case at least every 3 months.

2. Proper use, care and storage of contact lenses and supplies

Don’t sleep in your contact lenses. Sleeping in contact lenses increases the chance of an eye infection 6 to 8 times.

Replace your contact lenses as prescribed

Rinse out your contact lens case every morning, turn upside down and allow to air dry.

Soft Contact Lens Solutions

3. Regular visits to the optometrist

Contact lens materials and solutions change as do our eyes. To maintain good vision and healthy eyes have an eye examination every year.

Established contact lens wearers tend to have higher levels of case contamination compared to new contact lens wearers. Poor contact lens habits develop over time, don’t become compliant, remember the details of good contact lens care to ensure your continued successful contact lens use.

25
Feb

New Frames at Westside Optometry

 Westside Optometry has added a new frame designer to our eyewear collections.
MODO is driven by a passion for finding the optimal balance of form and function. The designers explore materials, manufacturing technologies, and craftsmanship techniques for designs that look and feel perfect.

The collection includes styles for men and women in lightweight materials and amazing colors. We know you’ll appreciate the look and comfort of  the MODO frames.

 

 

23
Jan

What Are the Symptoms of Glaucoma?

Do you think you will know if you have glaucoma?

The first symptom of the most common type of glaucoma (open angle) is permanent loss of vision. Once vision loss occurs it is downhill, the damage from glaucoma is irreversible and challenging to slow down.
Glaucoma signs include increase intra-ocular pressure (IOP) which is measured during an eye exam. Visual field loss, also measured during an eye examination and loss of retinal nerve fibers and damage to the optic nerve, visible during a dilated eye examination. The best way to determine if you have or are at risk of glaucoma is by having a dilated eye examination.

What is Glaucoma?

Glaucoma is a disease of the optic nerve usually caused by increased pressure inside the eye.

Glaucoma Risk Factors:

Family history

Age – greater than 60

Diabetes

Race – African American have higher risk

Treatment

Glaucoma is treated with drops or surgery and sometimes both.

Don’t wait until you have vision loss to learn that you have glaucoma, schedule an eye exam today.

 

12
Jan

What is Glaucoma?

January is Glaucoma Awareness Month