Safety Glasses

19
Oct

New Safety Eyewear

90% of all eye injuries are preventable with proper use of protective eyewear. (Agency of Healthcare Research and Quality)

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Westside Optometry has a new line of safety eyewear. The new Wiley X frames meet ANSI Z87.1 high velocity and high mass impact standards. All the WorkSight glasses come with permanent or detachable side shields, a fold over case that folds flat for easy storage, 100 percent UVA/UVB protection and distortion-free clarity. And the best part is the frames are stylish enough to wear for those unplanned trips to the hardware or grocery store.

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23
Jun

5 Tips to Healthy Eyes this Summer

Contact Lens Safety in water 

Wear sunglasses with UV protection

 
Did you know that it is actually possible for your eyes to get sunburned?! Just like your skin, your eyes need protection from the sun. Wearing sunglasses outdoors is very important in protecting your eyes from harmful UV rays. Excessive exposure to UV light can also increase your risk for developing early cataracts and macular degeneration. When looking for a new pair of sunglasses, make sure that they have a minimum UV 400 protection and that they block both UVA and UVB rays. Additionally, sunglasses will provide a shield of protection from dust and debris that can get blown into your eyes, which is a great added bonus, especially on those windy beach days!

Maintain safe wear and care of contact lenses

Keep your eyes healthy this summer by practicing safe contact lens wear. Long days, hot weather, travel, and lots of time outdoors can put you at a higher risk of developing a contact lens-related eye problem. In order to minimize this risk don’t forget to maintain proper contact lens hygiene! Remember to make sure that your hands are washed before handling your contact lenses, always use fresh contact lens solution, and minimize contact with water; this includes removing your contacts before going swimming or in a hot tub. And if you notice any redness, irritation, light sensitivity, decreased vision, or discharge, do not wear your contacts and call the office immediately.

Wear protective eyewear

Summertime often means working on projects around the house. This can include gardening, painting, remodeling, etc. that can potentially result in small objects flying around. Make sure you wear proper eye protection during these activities. And by eye protection, this does not mean regular glasses or sunglasses, this means professional quality goggles with impact resistant lenses and full coverage frame. You’ll also want to be sure to protect your peepers while playing sports, especially those that utilize small sized balls, such as golf balls, squash balls, and badminton shuttlecocks. Wearing proper eyewear can prevent up to 90 percent of serious eye injuries. If you do experience an eye injury, make sure to call us so that a proper eye health examination can be performed.

Avoid chemicals and natural irritants

Chemicals found in pools and bacteria often found in lakes and rivers can be harmful or bothersome to your eyes. Be sure to always wear goggles if you will be opening your eyes while playing or swimming in water. Other natural irritants that you may be exposed to while outdoors or hiking can include poison ivy, oak, and insect bites. If you find yourself outside near these irritants, be mindful of keeping your hands clean after touching plants, as rubbing allergens into your eyes can be very uncomfortable. If you notice any eye irritation, swelling, or redness, after any of these activities, contact the office so we can aid in determining the cause and help relieve your symptoms.

Schedule your yearly eye examination

Since you and the kids often have a little extra free time over the summer, it is the perfect time to schedule your annual eye examination?! A comprehensive eye exam is one of the most important preventative ways to preserve vision, and is the only way to accurately assess the health of your eyes, diagnose an eye disorder or disease, and determine if you require corrective lenses. Catching potential eye problems early could save your vision in the future, and that makes for an extremely bright and happy summer! Schedule online.

30
Sep

Choosing the Best Lens for your Glasses

The lenses you choose for your eyeglasses – even more than the frames – often will determine how happy you are with your eyewear.
When buying eyeglasses, the frame you choose is important to both your appearance and your comfort when wearing glasses. But the eyeglass lenses you choose influence four factors: appearance, comfort, vision and safety.
A common mistake people make when buying eyeglasses is not spending enough time considering their choices of lens materials , designs and coatings.

 

Lens Materials

Eyeglass lens thickness is determined in part by the size and style of the frame you choose. For thinner lenses, choose smaller, round or oval frames; plastic frames hide edge thickness better.
Glass Lenses. Originally, all the eyeglass lenses were made of glass. Although glass lenses offer exceptional optics, they are heavy and can break, potentially causing serious harm to the eye or even loss of an eye. For these reasons, glass lenses are not used for eyeglasses very often.

Plastic Lenses. The first plastic eyeglass lenses were made of a plastic polymer called CR-39. Because it is half the weight of glass, has good optics and is inexpensive, it remains a popular choice for lens material.

Polycarbonate Lenses were introduced in the 1970s for safety glasses. Originally developed for helmet visors for the Air Force it offers a lighter and significantly more impact-resistant option. It is preferred for children’s eyewear, safety glasses and sports eyewear.

Trivex is a newer lightweight eyeglass material with similar impact-resistant properties as polycarbonate. It has better clarity than the polycarbonate, but isn’t quite as thin.

High-Index Plastic Lenses are indicated for thinner, lighter eyeglasses. High-index materials also provide UV protection.

Lens Treatments

For more comfortable and better looking glasses, the following lens treatments are available.

Anti-Reflective Coating (ARC) makes all eyeglass lenses look and perform better.  AR vs no ARARC eliminates reflections in lenses that reduce contrast and clarity, especially at night. The coating makes the lenses look invisible and increase the transmission of light. This is especially important in high index lenses, because of the higher index of refraction that causes more light to be reflected.

Adaptive Lenses or Transitions change color depending on the ambient ultraviolet light levels.

Digital Lenses reduce aberrations and improve clarity. This is most important in higher prescriptions and progressive lenses.

The next time you are selecting glasses, take advantage of the Westside Optometry team to design the optimum pair for you.

28
May

Caring for your Glasses

You have carefully selected the best lens design and material fit in a stylish frame; it is important to take good care of your new eyewear.

eye glass care

  • Remove glasses from your face with two hands
  • Never place glasses lens side down, it is best to put them in their case when not wearing them
  • Clean glasses with water and a little oil-free soap. Wipe them with a clean cloth or a cloth especially designed for your lenses
  • Do not leave glasses on the dashboard of your car. (It gets too hot for the frame and any coatings on the lenses)
  • If your glasses start to slide or feel lopsided on your face, come by the office for an adjustment
28
Jan

Eye Emergencies: What to do?

Something in the eye/eye pain

Are any of the following true?

  • The foreign body can be seen, and remains after gentle washing. Eye Injury
  • The injury has penetrated the globe of the eye.
  • Blood can be seen in the eye.
  • It feels as though something is trapped under the eyelid.

Call the office immediately, especially if the vision is blurry and/or there is eyepain.

Blunt Trauma

such as the eye is hit with a ball, fist or other object

Are any of the following true?

  • The lid is swollen shut.
  • There is blood.
  • The front of the eye is hazy or white.
  • The pupil is irregularly shaped, dilated or constricted.

Call the office, especially if the vision is blurry, or there is pain. If none of the above signs are present, apply ice packs for the first 2 hours.

For more information about preventing eye injuries or what to do if something splashes into the eye causing a  chemical burn click on the appropriate link.

9
Jan

2014 Eye Resolutions

Your vision and eye health  are important every day of the year. Make changes now for a lifetime of good vision.

Eat Smart. Diet and nutritional supplements go a long way in promoting eye health. Studies show a diet rich in fruits, leafy vegetables and omega-3 fatty acids may reduce your risk of eye problems like macular degeneration and dry eye syndrome.

Get Moving. Research has shown higher levels of physical exercise can reduce certain risk factors for glaucoma, as well as macular degeneration. iStock_000023582367Small
Quit smoking. Put simply, smoking harms your vision. Studies show smoking dramatically increases the likelihood of developing cataracts, macular degeneration,uveitis and diabetic retinopathy.
Wear Sunglasses. Protect your eyes from the sun (and make sure your kids do, too). Always wear sunglasses with UV protection when outdoors — no matter what time of year — to shield your eyes from UV rays. This may reduce your risk for cataracts and macular degeneration.
Start using safety eyewear for lawn-mowing, home repairs and other chores. Experts say 90 percent of eye injuries requiring a visit to the emergency room can be prevented with proper safety eyewear.

Properly Care for your Contact Lenses. Dirty contact lenses, even if they are not uncomfortable, can cause serious eye infections. Clean your contact lenses and contact lens case properly, and always replace your contacts as recommended.
Reduce Computer Eye Strain. Rest your eyes from computer work every 20 minutes to relieve computer vision syndrome and avoid dry, red eyes. Also, ask Dr. Griffith or Staton about stress-relieving computer glasses.
Improve Your Vision. If you’ve been putting up with contact lens discomfort, dry eyes, eye allergies or blurry vision, talk to us about changes you can make to improve or eliminate these problems.

Upgrade your contact lenses. Contact lenses come in a wide variety of materials, replacement schedules and wearing times — not to mention the array of color contact lenses and special effect contacts available. With the advancement in contact lens technology, there’s sure to be a type of contact lens that suits your individual requirements and lifestyle.

Improve Your Appearance. Upgrade your eyewear. Get with the times and refresh your look, as well as take advantage of the latest in lens and frame technologies. Try eyeglass lens coatings. Various lens coatings keep your field of view clear by reducing reflections, fogging and scratches. And eliminate glare during outdoor activities with polarized sunglasses. If you have a strong prescription, try high index eyeglass lenses. High index lenses provide the same optical power as regular ones, but are thinner and lighter.

Considering LASIK? If you’re tired of wearing glasses or contacts, ask your us if you are a good candidate for LASIK or other vision correction surgery.

Schedule an Eye Exam for everyone in your family. Kids and seniors, especially, should have comprehensive annual eye exams to monitor vision changes. Also, have your family doctor screen you for diabetes and hypertension — if left untreated, these diseases can lead to serious eye problems. (707)762-8643.

3
Oct

Eye Safety Month

October is eye safety month, what precautions are you taking to prevent eye injury and trauma?

Protective EyewearAt Westside Optometry we have a complete selection  of sports eyewear for the young and the experienced athlete. Protective eyewear is as important to your game as proper shoes and padding. Sports goggles can be made in all prescriptions, with or without a tint.

 

Protective eyewear isn’t just for the workplace or industrial setting, Most eye injuries happen at home. Non-prescription protective eyewear is available at hardware stores. If you safety framesusually wear glasses, prescription safety glasses are recommended. All our safety eyewear is available with side shields and meet the ANSI.

 

Click here to learn more about eye emergencies.

28
Mar

Safety Glasses

Most people wouldn’t dream of mowing the lawn barefoot. But most people don’t hesitate to  weed-whack without protective eyewear. Eye injuries from  rocks and debris thrown by household tools like lawn mowers, chain saws and weed trimmers occur daily.

weed wacker

In California, OSHA regulations and enforcement of personal protective equipment have reduced the number of injuries in the workplace. Now most eye injuries happen at home.

 

What makes safety glasses safe?

Safety frames must pass two rigorous impact tests, which dress frames do not undergo, to be marked Z87 (the ANSI, American National Standards Institute, requirement). A special device call an Alderson Head Form, which simulates a physical human head is used.

The High Velocity Impact Test

A 1/4″ steel ball traveling at 150 feet per second is directed at different designated positions on the front and side of a frame glazed with plano lenses. No contact with the eye or head form is permitted as a result of the impact, nor shall any parts or fragment be ejected from the protector that could contact an eye of the head form.

The High Mass Impact Test

A pointed projectile weighing 17.6 ounces is dropped from a height of 51.2″ on a glazed frame. No parts or fragments shall be ejected from the protector that could contact an eye of the head form.

Prescription Safety Frames

If you need correction to see, safety frames can be made with prescription lenses that meet ANSI. The lenses and frame will have Z87 on them. The lenses must pass a drop ball test. (A 1″ steel ball is dropped on the lens from 50″ high.)

Please note that safety glasses and sports glasses are not interchangeable. Sport glasses do not need to pass ANSI tests and safety glasses are not appropriate for sports applications.

If you are working in the yard or the garage, put on a pair of safety glasses. Westside Optometry has different styles of ANSI approved safety glasses to make in prescription. We offer safety frames in plastic and metal materials with side shield options.

To see chart of  eye hazards and the recommended protective device, click here.

3
Jan

New Year’s Resolutions for Better Vision

 

2013 can be the year you have the best vision possible. Below are some suggestions to help you.

Improve Your Eye Health

  • Eat smart. Diet and nutritional supplements go a long way in promoting eye health. Studies show a diet rich in fruits, leafy vegetables and omega-3 fatty acids may reduce your risk of eye problems like macular degeneration and dry eye syndrome.
  •  Get moving. Research has shown higher levels of physical exercise can reduce certain risk factors for glaucoma, as well as macular degeneration.
  • Quit smoking. Put simply, smoking harms your vision. Studies show smoking dramatically increases the likelihood of developing cataracts, macular degeneration,uveitis and diabetic retinopathy.
  • Protect your eyes from the sun (and make sure your kids do, too). Always wear sunglasses with UV protection when outdoors — no matter what time of year — to shield your eyes from UV rays. This may reduce your risk for cataracts and macular degeneration.
  •  Schedule an eye exam for everyone in your family. Kids and seniors, especially, should have comprehensive annual eye exams to monitor vision changes. Also, have your family doctor screen you for diabetes and hypertension — if left untreated, these diseases can lead to serious eye problems.
  •  Start using safety eyewear for lawn-mowing, home repairs and other chores. Experts say 90 percent of eye injuries requiring a visit to the emergency room can be prevented with proper safety eyewear.
  •  Properly care for your contact lenses. Dirty contact lenses, even if they are not uncomfortable, can cause serious eye infections. Clean your contact lenses and contact lens case properly, and always replace your contacts as recommended.
  •  Reduce computer eye strain. Rest your eyes from computer work every 20 minutes to relieve computer vision syndrome and avoid dry, red eyes. Also, ask your eye doctor about stress-relieving computer glasses.
  •  If you’ve been putting up with contact lens discomfort, dry eyes, eye allergies or blurry vision, talk to me about changes you can make to improve or eliminate these problems.

Improve Your Vision

  •  Blurriness? If your contacts or glasses are no longer doing their job,  you may need a new prescription and/or a different lens design.
  • Upgrade your contact lenses. Contact lenses come in a wide variety of materials, replacement schedules and wearing times — not to mention the array of color contact lenses and special effect contacts available.
  • With the advancement in contact lens technology, there’s sure to be a type of contact lens that suits your individual requirements and lifestyle.
  • Try eyeglass lens coatings. Various lens coatings keep your field of view clear by reducing reflections, fogging and scratches. And eliminate glare during outdoor activities with polarized sunglasses.
  • Consider sports-specific eyewear. For athletes and sporting enthusiasts, there are performance-enhancing frames and lenses designed specifically for different sports and outdoor activities.
  • Make sure your sports eyewear includes lightweight, impact-resistant polycarbonate or Trivex lenses for comfort and safety.

Improve Your Appearance

  • Upgrade your eyewear. Get with the times and refresh your look, as well as take advantage of the latest in lens and frame technologies.
  • If you have a strong prescription, try high index eyeglass lenses. High index lenses provide the same optical power as regular ones, but are thinner and lighter.
  • Considering LASIK? If you’re tired of wearing glasses or contacts, ask your us if you are a good candidate for LASIK or other vision correction surgery.
25
Oct

First Aid for Eye Emergencies

Below I have included information from the National Society to Prevent Blindness for first aid treatment for eye emergencies. I have added some information to help you decide when to seek professional help. If in doubt, call Westside Optometry or go to the nearest emergency department.

Chemical Burns
Eye damage from chemical burns may be extremely serious, as from alkalis or caustic acids; or less severe, as from chemical “irritants.”
DO flush the eye with water immediately, continuously and gently, for at least 15 minutes. Hold head under faucet or pour water into the eye using any clean container. Keep eye open as widely as possible during flushing.
DO see a doctor or go to the emergency room.
DO NOT use an eye cup, the water must run off your eye and use lots of it.

If a contact lens is in the eye, begin flushing over the lens immediately. This may wash away the lens.
DO NOT bandage the eye.

Spray cans are a common source of chemical eye injury, compounded by the force of contact. Whether containing caustics or “irritants,” they must be carefully used and kept away from children.

Specks in the Eye
DO lift upper eyelid outward and down over the lower lid.
DO let tears wash out speck or particle
If the speck doesn’t wash out – keep eye closed, bandage lightly and see a doctor.
DO NOT rub the eye.
DO NOT try to remove with a finger or any other object.

If you suspect the particle is metal, call the office immediately, do not wait until the next day.  Metallic foreign bodies can rust overnight creating a larger area of damage.

Blows to the Eye
DO apply cold compresses immediately without putting pressure on the eye for 15 minutes; again each hour as needed to reduce pain and swelling.
DO  see a doctor if there is discoloration or a “black eye”
DO  seek emergency care if there is pain, blurred or double vision

Cuts and Punctures of Eye or Eyelid
DO bandage lightly and see a doctor at once. The bottom half of a paper cup can be used.
DO NOT wash out the eye with water.
DO NOT try to remove an object stuck in the eye.

 Prevention

Of course, preventing eye injuries is the wisest action.

Wear eye protection for all hazardous activities and sports -at school, home and on the job.

Stock a first aid kit with a rigid eye shield and commercial eyewash before an eye injury happens.

DO NOT assume that any eye injury is harmless. When in doubt, give us a call or go to the emergency department.